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 Home extension guide - how to build a house extension and refurbish your home
 

 

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TYPES OF HOME EXTENSION TO CONSIDER

Each home extension is usually very unique to that site and homeowner. However, house extension works can be generically categorised into various types:-

The single storey extension - These can be located on any part of the property. There sizes can be affected by building lines, adjoining property sitings etc. if formal Planning Permission is required. Single storey extensions are possibly the most flexible and common type of home improvement due to their versatility. They can be utilised to extend a single room or add extra rooms or both. They can also prevent future extensions if not properly designed or thought through. They can help tie in awkwardly used areas into very usable areas. They can help create open plan environments to simply adding a small utility. Their roof designs, external materials, lazing options and uses are endless.

The porch extension - From a simple open sided canopy to a completely enclosed front extension housing a cloaks area, study or hall extension for e example. Many are just glorified draft excluders while others can completely over-scale the original dwelling. Many are built without formal planning where anything goes. Some help enhance a house character while other destroy it. They are possibly the most personalised element of building works there is for a home extension.

The two storey side extension - Very common for detached and semi-detached properties having a 3M or greater side section of land within their curtilage. Usually require planning consent and, as such, require a 1M min. distance gap at the first floor level. Most need setting back from the front elevation to maintain broken wall and roof lines for interesting shapes. Great for adding additional bedroom space, en-suites or simply extending existing bedrooms. Can have size limitations due to planning constraints. Use of loft space for later conversion can be difficult.

The two storey rear extension - usually the least contentious in planning terms accept for semi-detached properties when neighbouring window light angles are considered. Usually required for adding extra bedrooms as a primary requirement but needing additional ground floor space as well in order to support the new structure over. Can affect existing bedrooms due to covering existing bedroom windows. Needs careful planning of internal layout to obtain best use of space & well proportioned rooms.

First floor extensions over existing structures - Unless ground floor structure was recently built it may not be suitable for supporting new works over. Ground floor structure can often determine layout of first floor over that my not be best use of the first floor place. Usually requires complete removal of ground floor structures due to unacceptable compromises or unsuitability of supporting extra weight. When the existing ground floor structures are suitable for the new first floor extension over, it can become a very effective and economical way of adding extra bed space or amenities.

The loft conversion with Velux roof lights - Existing roof void needs to have an internal clear 3M floor to ridge height for it to be half usable and effective as a bedroom. Location of stairs need careful planning and is a balance of maximising best use of roof void space without adversely reducing first or ground floor space. Can be used for bungalows and two storey dwelling houses. Very economical using Velux roof lights instead of dormer windows. Often does not require formal Planning Consent. Not always best for a fully hipped roof due to restricted ceiling headroom. Often only best for forming 1 extra bedroom unless the existing roof void has a very large in footprint area.

The loft conversion using dormer windows - Existing roof voids needs to have an internal clear 2.4M floor to ridge height for it to be half usable and effective as a bedroom. Location of stairs need careful planning and is a balance of maximising best use of roof void space without adversely reducing first or ground floor space. Can be used for bungalows and two storey dwelling houses. Can be expensive using dormer windows and often need to be very large for maximum gain of floor space usually at the cost of a pleasing external design. Often does not require formal Planning Consent if dormers face rear & of a certain volume. Not always best for a fully hipped roof due to restricted ceiling headroom. Often only best for forming 1 extra bedroom unless the existing roof void has a very large in footprint area.

The loft conversion using a roof extension (hip to gable end) - Makes roof void floor area maximum possible. Can be formed without formal planning permission in certain situations. Can use either Velux roof lights or dormer windows for light & added space. Location of stairs need careful planning and is a balance of maximising best use of roof void space without adversely reducing first or ground floor space. Can be used for bungalows and two storey dwelling houses.


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